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Top 10 Tallest Buildings in the World (as of April 2017)

Posted in Architectural Territory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 8, 2017 by vincentloy

The two cities that witness the birth of skyscrapers are Chicago and New York City in United States. That was over a hundred years ago after the introduction of steel framed construction and passenger elevator that enables buildings to be built much taller. Now in 2017, only one building in United States that is placed within the top 10 tallest buildings in the world currently. The other 9 are generally all located in Asia. Here below is the current top 10 tallest buildings in the world as of April 2017. The list only includes completed buildings and does not include television towers, observation towers, masts, antennas or buildings with very little percentage of habitable floors.

  1. Burj Khalifa, 828 metres, 163 floors, Dubai, United Arab Emirates (completed in 2010).

2. Shanghai Tower, 632 metres, 128 floors, Shanghai, China (completed in 2015).

3. Makkah Royal Clock Tower, 601 metres, 120 floors, Mecca, Saudi Arabia (completed in 2012).

4. Ping An Finance Center, 599 metres, 115 floors, Shenzhen, China (completed in 2017).

5. Lotte World Tower, 555 metres, 123 floors, Seoul, South Korea (completed in 2017).

6. One World Trade Center, 541 metres, 104 floors, New York City, United States (completed in 2014).

7. Guangzhou CTF Finance Centre, 530 metres, 111 floors, Guangzhou, China (completed in 2016).

8. Taipei 101, 508 metres, 101 floors, Taipei, Taiwan (completed in 2004).

9. Shanghai World Financial Center, 492 metres, 101 floors, Shanghai, China (completed in 2008).

10. International Commerce Centre, 484 metres, 108 floors, Hong Kong, China (completed in 2010).

This list will change drastically from year to year due to rapid increase of construction of supertall skyscrapers in the world in recent decade. More and more new buildings are reaching further to the sky. Out of the current top 10 tallest buildings in the world, half of them are in China (this doesn’t even include Taipei 101 in Taiwan). 8 of them soar above 500 metres in height respectively too. Also noted is that every buildings in this top 10 tallest list has over 100 floors respectively. The tallest in the world, Burj Khalifa has been on the top of the list for over 7 years now. By 2020, it is expected to be defeated by Kingdom Tower, a skyscraper currently under construction in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. That tower is projected to soar above 1000 metres (1 km!) when completed in 2020.

The oldest supertall in this list is Taipei 101 which is only 13 years old by now as it is built in 2004. More and more new buildings are joining the list with two newcomers this year; Ping An Finance Center and Lotte World Tower at No.4 and No.5 placing respectively. Former world’s tallest buildings and still the current world’s tallest twin buildings, the Petronas Twin Towers are kicked out of the top 10 list this year as they are now placed at No.11 (and 12) with height of 452 metres. Too bad…my home coutry’s famous twin towers are now out of the ranking. Anyway, in few years to come, Malaysia will have another new supertall; PNB 118 Tower that will certainly join this top 10 list with a height of over 600 metres.

(Images in this post are from various sources throughout the world wide web)

Urban design is fun.

Posted in Architectural Territory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 19, 2016 by vincentloy

Urban design is the first out of the three design studios I have to complete in my Master of Architecture course. It is generally defined as the process of giving form, shape, and character to groups of buildings, to whole neighborhoods, and the city. It is a framework that orders the elements into a network of streets, squares, and blocks. Urban design is also about making connections between people and places, movement and urban form, nature and the built fabric and the goal is usually to make the urban areas more functional, attractive and sustainable.

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Before I take on this design studio, I have had already some interest in urban design. I do like to see how and where the buildings were placed in relation to each other and their significance to the overall masterplan. I have been to many cities with unique urban planning before like Siem Reap (the ancient city of Angkor where the famous Angkor Wat temple is at the centre), Beijing (city spine or axis from Tiananmen Square to Forbidden City and then all the way up straight to Olympic Park, picture below), Paris (the streets and uniform building heights and patterns), Seoul (the Cheonggyecheon River and the public realm along it, picture below), etc. I like to research on the many urban case studies across the world from the ancient or historical city planning to the ones in the present. They are not only useful to my study in this particular studio but also beneficial for my extra knowledge on this field that involves a lot of parties (architect, urban planner, landscape architect, engineers, authority, etc).

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After this studio that I have completed, I do discovered many more useful information and knowledge behind a successful urban design. Here below are the top 10 urban design knowledge that I have learnt from my studio which can be seen as the basic principles or guidelines on creating a good urban planning:

(1) Be pedestrian-friendly. Pedestrian streets over vehicular roads.

Urban design is mostly about creating good environment for people to walk, to see, to play, to shop, to eat, etc. Having beautiful pedestrian streets or promenades gives a nice and safe ambience to people. Lesser attention to roads.

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(2) Activate ground level. 

Ground level is where all the things should be happening. Skywalks (those pedestrian bridges) are now very popular urban trend to link buildings away and above the roads. They may be useful but they are sometimes bad on preventing people to be on ground level. Try makes the public spaces on the ground to be interesting to draw people to that level.

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(3) Continue lines from existing urban or city grid. And create new ones too.

To start on your master planning, try as much as you can to link your newly proposed roads or streets to the existing ones outside your site boundary to create a continuity so that your masterplan isn’t in its ‘own world’. Linking to existing urban patterns (grids) is very important for a continuous uninterrupted flow around or within the urban area.

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(4) Have a driver or an overall concept.

It is preferred to have a main strategy before starting on the urban planning. A main concept or driver to your imagined urban development. For example, you can have your site to be transit-oriented (main focus on transportation links), or water-oriented (priority for water views or for various interaction or engagement with people from water). Have a look on some good examples of successful urban projects across the world. Research on them, make them as your precedent studies, and maybe you can find certain interesting elements to be incorporated in your urban design as well.

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(5) Emphasize on views, vantage points, visual axis or linkage. See at human scale.

View is important. When you are proposing a street here, try and imagine what would people see at the end of this particular street? It’s best that the planning is done to allow people to have certain intended view (for example, view of a river, view of a sculpture, view of an interesting roof, view of a major park, or view that directs people to another angle, etc). Always see from a human scale.

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(6) Have something as the centrepiece of the planning.

It’s always an ideal way to have something that stood out among the rest in your masterplan. It would be boring to have all proposed built forms in your masterplan to have uniform and similar strength, proportion, height or scale. Have one particularly large or tall building (a landmark) as the limelight of the overall masterplan. Or if you think that is unnecessary, have a main public square as the node of your planning. On the other hand, try to propose a few more civic or community buildings like library, aquarium, sports hall, shopping mall, museums, art gallery, etc to create a sense of place and to gives identity to the particular urban area or city.

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(7) More parks, plazas or squares. Public realm is the most important.

Create these spaces for people to walk, relax, interact, etc. Public space is the priority in an urban design. Have them designed in a way that it invites people, it engages people, it attracts people, at any time of the day if possible. It’s not about the quantity too as it’s about quality. Having a lot of parks or plazas may not be good as this approach will make people to go on separate ways since they have many choices to make (on which parks or plazas to go).

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(8) Connectivity and practicality in mind.

It would be cool to have the urban planning to feature extensive greenery, massive parks, huge waterways, etc. You can be daring in your design. However, kindly think of whether it is practical to have that. Will it interrupts flow of people? Can it be accessed by cars? Can the disabled go over there? Can goods or loading be done over here to cater for this building? Also think about the distance to reach a place from the office, from the mall, from the homes, from the hotel, etc. On the other hand, car park is an ugly building but it is very much needed even if you don’t like it. How are you going to have that in your masterplan while not being a waste of space or being an unpleasant sight? Avoid from having car park taking up ground level and preferably place it in basements or in a podium together with facility floors. You can even propose to treat the facade of the car park podium to be interesting. But let’s not get into detail of buildings as urban design is not about that.

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(9) Be green. 

Everything is about sustainability now in the architecture world. It’s good to bring the nature back into your masterplan by proposing parks with extensive landscaping (or even lakes, etc) as people love to enjoy the nature if it’s provided and it’s beautiful. Be green in this case also means having your masterplan to work in a way that you envisioned it to be energy efficient by having the future built forms in the site to have maximum exposure to natural daylight, making use of wind direction, sun orientation, etc.

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(10) Think about land use, setbacks and mass of buildings. 

This is where standard comes in. There is the setbacks to buildings that you have to provide when setting out your proposed location of new built forms. Each authority has their own set of guidelines on it, and it includes also on the mass of building (height, density limit, etc). As for the zoning, try to think over and over again why would you want to propose a hotel here instead of at the other places in your site. That’s one of the examples. If you can’t find good reason for it, then it’s not a good urban design decision. Work on it again.

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In conclusion, urban design is mostly about people and its about the spaces between buildings (roads, streets, parks, boulevards, lanes, plazas, walkways, etc). Social system goes above vehicular system. People over cars. A good urban design facilitates human interaction, activates dead spaces, ensures smooth flow and permeability, and caters to a demand-seeking future. A masterplan should be flexible, able to adapt to future changes or addition of new built forms if possible. It should be done to prepare the site to meet demands in the future especially when all the cities now are growing fast with increasing need for more residential, commercial, leisure or tourism developments. When you are designing a masterplan, imagine being in there yourself, what do you want to see, where do you want to go, what do you want to do once you are in that space? Have plenty of good reasoning to all the design making decisions you have make, and then you will have an excellent masterplan. There is no right or wrong but there is a point where we know whether it works or not. It requires a lot of thinking in macro-scale. That’s what differentiates urban design from architecture.

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(Images in this post are from various sources throughout the world wide web)

More updated details for KL118 Tower.

Posted in Architectural Territory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 28, 2016 by vincentloy

Finally, after months and months of speculation and secrecy surrounding Malaysia’s plan for the next tallest building of the country, more details had been revealed recently from the officiating ceremony. What is the project that I’m talking about? It’s the KL118 development. Now, it is renamed to PNB118 since PNB is the name of the owner’s company for this project. Well, I prefer KL118 more as it has more international appeal than ‘PNB’. Nobody knows (not only foreigners but also locals) what does PNB stands for.

Also known as ‘Warisan Merdeka’ (Heritage Independence), this development is located on a site just adjacent to the historic Stadium Merdeka and Stadium Negara. It is also located nearby to some very old buildings like Victoria Institution, Methodist Boys School (my former secondary school), Chin Woo Stadium, and Petaling Street (Chinatown). The project has been receiving heavy criticism due to its location on low-lying area which is also full of historical buildings and that this new modern supertall would not fit into this site context. I agreed. This project also receiving strong objection as the money put into this can be more beneficial for other purposes as the city does not need another supertall yet.

The iconic feature of this development would be the construction of an 118-storey tower, now named PNB 118 Tower. The final height of this skyscraper is still not confirmed but it is now fixed to be between 600 metres to 650 metres. Some sources said 610 metres or 630 metres while some even said it would be 644 metres tall which would make it even taller than the Shanghai Tower, the current world’s second tallest building. No matter what the final height is, this PNB118 Tower would still easily be the country’s new tallest building as well as one of top five world’s tallest buildings once it is completed. And it is announced recently that it is expected to be completed in 2024. Years ago, it is planned for completion by 2020 to coincide with Wawasan 2020 (Vision 2020) when the country would become a developed nation by year 2020. However, the project faced delay and it’s getting back on track now. It is now officially under construction.

The tower is designed by Fender Katsalidis Architects, an architecture office based in Melbourne, Australia which is previously famous for designing Eureka Tower in Melbourne. The design is also not that well received as many people commented that it is too simple, too glassy and do not possess timeless elegance like what Petronas Twin Towers achieved. I agreed to these opinions too. However, after its official rendering and an animation clip of the tower are out recently, some changed their mind and started to like the design. I’m one of them, but I still think that the design needs further improvement especially on its treatment to the top where it meets the spire. The spire is also a bit too long and out of proportion in comparison to the building form and volume. I knew it is just there to increase a substantial height for the building just to have it to be placed higher in the list of world’s tallest buildings later on.

So, here below are some new (latest) renderings, plan view and models’ images of the PNB118 Tower and also an animation clip for it by RSP Architects, the local design consultant for this project.

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Looking forward to see this new skyscraper dominating the skyline of Kuala Lumpur as soon as possible. Hmm…I suddenly changed my mind and think that KL needs a new supertall now since Petronas Twin Towers have been here for almost two decades already. However, it is undeniable that the twin towers are still elegant and remain as icon of the country forever.

(Images in this post are from various sources throughout the world wide web)

 

World’s highest and longest glass-bottomed bridge opened in China recently with the level of hype I never expected.

Posted in Explosive News and Results with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 5, 2015 by vincentloy

I guessed most of you should have known this by now; China had recently opened the world’s highest and longest glass-bottomed bridge. It is also China’s first bridge of its kind. Videos of people ‘bravely’ crossing and introducing that particular bridge are widely circulated through social networking sites and reported in most news articles recently till the point that almost everyone is talking about it now. Experiences of the first pack of the bridge’s visitors; some closed their eyes while crossing due to the fear of height. Some felt dizzy straight away. Some were afraid but successfully crossed through the entire bridge to prove his/her guts.

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If you still don’t know anything of this bridge, you must be living in the jungle. For me, it is nothing more than a glass bridge. It is interesting but I’m surprised of the level of hype it obtained now till the point that I have to share it in my blog here. I will only check out the bridge if I’m happened to be passing by or visiting the national park where it is located. If not, I would not purposely go there just to see the bridge. Anyway, here you go for a bit of information regarding this bridge; When translated directly to English, the bridge is called Brave Men’s Bridge. It is a glass walkway of 300 metres long and is suspended 180 meters above a sheer drop in Shiniuzhai National Geological Park, China’s central Hunan Province.

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Each of the glass panes is 24 millimeters thick and is believed to be 25 times stronger than normal glass. One worker who built the bridge assured that the bridge will stand firm even if tourists are jumping on it. “The steel frame used to support and encase the glass bridge is also very strong and densely built, so even if a glass is broken, travelers won’t fall through.”, he added. The bridge was originally a wooden bridge before the park experimented by replacing a small section with glass in 2014. It decided to increase the thrill by revamping the whole overpass earlier this year, making it China’s first all-glass suspension bridge.

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Hunan is due to open another glass bridge later this year in the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon area, about 300 kilometers (186 miles) northwest of Shiniuzhai. When completed, the Zhangjiajie structure will be the world’s highest and longest glass bridge — 430 meters long and 300 meters high. Well, it appears that China is not only stretching their limits in building supertall skyscrapers (their recent trend) but also in constructing terrifying and challenging bridges like this one. This glass-bottomed bridge that allows people to ‘enjoy’ views directly below their feet is already drawing huge crowds due to its viral promotion on the internet as well as coinciding with the Golden Week of China, a week-long of holiday for China’s National Day celebration currently. This is the time when millions of China nationals will go for a vacation both inside or outside of country.

Talking about tourists from China. I’m not being discriminating but I believe most of you think the same. They have very bad moral and most of them don’t behave well. I have been a traveler quite frequently and I always bumped into usually large group of tourists from mainland China either in their country or even in other countries. Well, most of them are now wealthy and can go travelling anywhere they like. But their values of conduct are extremely low. Their discipline are awful. Whenever I encountered them, I find them really irritating, annoying, noisy, and showing disrespect to the tourist places. Well, there have been many articles showing their bad attitudes (not queuing, peeing on the public, harassing human-shaped sculptures or statues, vandalizing buildings or monuments, spitting wherever they like, etc) shared out and I couldn’t agree more. They don’t feel embarrassed by their own actions and that is what got me surprised. Something must be very wrong to their moral education in the past when they were young. Totally terrible…I’m not targeting all the Chinese nationals…but most of them!

I guess after this holiday week, the glass bridge would be extremely dirty straight away with multiple stains (of spits everywhere maybe…) or maybe even declared unsafe soon since there must be ‘thousands’ of them rushing to cross the bridge and it simply couldn’t hold the huge weight anymore. Who knows…

(Images and some information in this post are from this source: http://edition.cnn.com/2015/09/27/travel/china-glass-bridge-shiniuzhai/)

Zaha Hadid, the woman behind many fantastic architecture.

Posted in Architectural Territory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 3, 2015 by vincentloy

Zaha Hadid is a name no one will not recognize in the world of architecture. Her name always appears in whatever discussion I had with my colleagues about design projects. Her name also appears frequently in architecture-related news or articles since she and her office have been actively producing a lot of striking designs. Well, I guess she is the most famous now among all the present star architects. Well, how did she get there and how did she manage to climb to the top of the profession so successfully?

Let’s talk about a bit of her background. She is an Iraqi-British architect and would be turning 65 by end of this month.  She was born in Baghdad and grew up in one of the city’s first Bauhaus-inspired buildings during an era in which “modernism connoted glamour and progressive thinking” in the Middle East. She studied mathematics at the American University of Beirut before moving to study at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London.

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In 2004 she became the first woman recipient of the Pritzker Architecture Prize, the world’s highest honour awarded to architects annually. On the other hand, she had also received Stirling Prize in 2010 and 2011, and RIBA Gold Medal in 2015 (these two prizes are the most prestigious British awards for excellence in architecture). In 2008, she ranked 69th on the Forbes list of “The World’s 100 Most Powerful Women”. In 2012, she was also made a dame. Her architectural design firm, Zaha Hadid Architects, employs more than 350 people, and is headquartered in a Victorian former school building in Clerkenwell, London. She is also currently a professor at the University of Applied Arts Vienna in Austria.

Her buildings are distinctively neofuturistic, characterised by the “powerful, curving forms of her elongated structures” with “multiple perspective points and fragmented geometry to evoke the chaos of modern life”. She has been one of my idol architects because her designs are mostly very iconic, striking and usually stood out among the rest. She challenges the typical forms and structures, she gives new depths and dimensions to her spaces, and she ‘carved’ out things that we have never seen before most of the time. I believe that is what makes her works always being regarded as groundbreaking design. Here below are ten of her completed works that I admired:

Hungerburgbahn Station, Innsbruck, Austria.

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Bridge Pavilion, Zaragoza, Spain.

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Guangzhou Opera House, Guangzhou, China.

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Galaxy SOHO, Beijing, China.

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Riverside Museum, Glasgow, Scotland.

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Heydar Aliyev Center, Baku, Azerbaijan.

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Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, Michigan, USA.

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Jockey Club Innovation Tower, Hong Kong, China.

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Dongdaemun Design Plaza, Seoul, South Korea.

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Wangjing SOHO, Beijing, China.

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These projects above are only the ones completed as she do has a lot of designs not materialized since they are mostly too ambitious and some simply couldn’t accept due to the technical difficulties, high cost, and excessively extravagant appearances. For the most recent example, her winning design proposal for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Stadium is scrapped by the authority due to the above reasons I mentioned earlier. (image below)

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Also, actually, Zaha Hadid had designed a skyscraper in my city, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It’s called Sunrise Tower. Another futuristic looking design with two giant holes puncturing the building’s facade. (image below) However, the developer named other architect to design and Zaha Hadid’s first work in Malaysia could not be materialized. Too bad.

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I’m now thinking that it must be very good to work in Zaha Hadid Architects’ office. It’s like you are in a very distinguished design office and whoever ask you, ‘Who are you working for?’, and then I’ll say ‘Zaha Hadid’. Their reaction must be ‘Wow!’. I’m dreaming. Well, it’s like everyone knows her. Yes…even some people who are not in anyway involved in architecture knew her name. How I wish I can be as famous as her in architecture field in the future.

(Images in this post are from various sources throughout the world wide web)

 

My latest favourite skyscraper in KL: Ilham Baru Tower.

Posted in Architectural Territory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 22, 2015 by vincentloy

Forget about Petronas Twin Towers. I knew Malaysians are all bored to see the twin towers already since we have been seeing it for almost 20 years. However, we can’t deny that the twin towers still remains as the most striking icon or landmark of our nation. Despite losing the title of world’s tallest building years earlier, Petronas Twin Towers are still the current world’s tallest twin buildings. If we ignore the towers for a second, what is the other skyscraper in the city of Kuala Lumpur that you admire the most?

For me, my latest favourite skyscraper in the city is the Ilham Baru Tower (let’s shorten it to IB Tower). It is a tall mixed-use skyscraper comprising of offices and serviced apartments and is located nearby the twin towers. It is also nearby to my office, and hence, I can get to see the building for almost every day. I’m not tired of catching every glimpse of it. Well, you can easily spot the building from far since it is tall enough to stand out among the rest of the cluster of buildings in that part of the city.

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There has been a number of varying technical information regarding the building from what I have browsed from some sites online. But based on The Skyscraper Center (official site for worldwide skyscrapers), IB Tower has a height of 298 metres and a total of 64 floors above ground. However, I think the height and number of floors of the tower have been reduced to 274 metres and 58 floors respectively. It would be nice if someone can clarify to me about this issue.

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The tower is now still under-construction but has already topped out to its final height. It is expected to be completed by this year and opened next year. It is designed by Foster + Partners under the leading architect Norman Foster who have once received a Pritzker Prize (highest architectural prize in the world handed out annually to individual). Well, he is also the one designing Troika Tower (tallest residential building in Malaysia) which is just right besides the IB Tower. It’s great to have famous foreign architects to come and design something fantastic for buildings in my city.

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The design of the tower resembles a bit of the famous Bank of China Tower in Hong Kong from that glass cladding with zig-zag pattern feature. Well, IB Tower has a much darker-toned glass and is more complicated with integrated louvered fins which act as sun-shading device for the building. That is essential since the weather can be very hot in Malaysia. The form of the tower is also very interesting as a portion of an upper section of the tower is cut-in to make way for outdoor sky decks. The cut-in makes the building ‘lighter’ and gives extra ‘dimension’ and ‘depth’ to its form.

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I have written a post on this building about 3 years earlier when it is still at its early stage of construction. The link to that post: https://vincentloy.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/ilham-baru-tower-a-soon-to-be-addition-to-tall-buildings-in-kuala-lumpur/. It’s cool seeing the building rising up quickly to the skyline of the city and finally it has topped out and nears completion right now. Not only a great addition to the many buildings in Kuala Lumpur, IB Tower is also now the fourth tallest building in the city (also in the country), just behind Petronas Twin Towers and Telekom Tower.

From rendering to reality now:

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More information of the tower can be found in these following websites:

http://www.ilhamtower.com/index.html

http://skyscrapercenter.com/building/ilham-baru-tower/9344

http://www.fosterandpartners.com/projects/ilham-baru/

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1119813

(Images in this post are obtained from the forum site with link shown above except for the last image of which I own the copyright)

 

16th ARCHIDEX from 12th to 15th August 2015.

Posted in Explosive News and Results with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 12, 2015 by vincentloy

The annual International Architecture, Interior Design and Building Exhibition (ARCHIDEX) is back with its 16th edition this year. The exhibition began today and will run until this Saturday at the usual venue: Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre. The event is not only comprising of an exhibition that runs in several halls in the convention centre but also several conferences and design-related forums (DATUM KL International Architectural Design Conference, KL Design Forum, Green Building Forum, Professional Practice Forum) will be held at the same time. ARCHIDEX is always an important event particularly for people in the field of building construction, architecture and interior design. Even if you are not in this circle, you can still visit the exhibition to learn more about building construction and gain extra knowledge. Entrance is complimentary.

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(Image source: http://www.decra.com.my)

This event in recent years is also touted as Southeast Asia’s leading multi-national exhibition and networking event in the industry’s trade calendar. It has also earned itself a pivotal position as a leading gathering among the region’s fraternity of architects, urban planners, interior designers, developers, academicians, students and other related industry professionals.

I’m not going to miss it and I’m planning to go to the exhibition on this Saturday, the last day of the event. That’s the only day that I’m free to go since I have to work till Friday. I have been to ARCHIDEX for several years already and I knew what to expect from visiting the exhibition. There would be a lot of booths displaying, promoting and highlighting many latest building products, technologies and systems. What’s more exciting to me is that I will always return from the exhibition with a lot of free gifts: bags, pens, key chains, note books, brochures, and even small product samples. Entering with empty hands and leaving with plenty of bags! That’s my objective. Haha…

It’s also nice that we would be attended quickly if we are interested on certain things along the tour in the exhibition halls. And sometimes, I do get excited by some very advanced and never-seen-before products from the exhibition. But usually these items are very expensive. Listening to four or five people explaining their products is still fine, but as the visit progresses, I would be getting really tired of all the promotional talks and will just walk through many booths in a split second. That’s the time to avoid eye contact with the people from the booths. If not, I would be spending many hours there. That’s my past experience of visiting ARCHIDEX and this year, it will be the same for me on this coming Saturday.

On the other hand, there will be a section that displays excellent design presentation boards and some scaled models by local architecture students. This is where I will stay longer a bit to check out talent from young architecture students in Malaysia through their works. Unfortunately, ARCHIDEX didn’t emphasize much on this and we will only see very little from this section. As for the forums and conferences mentioned earlier, I would just say no as the entry fees are very costly and that most speakers invited are not famous and it’s not worth that much of money. Unless, they invite star architects like Zaha Hadid, Norman Foster, Cesar Pelli, etc.

Before I end this post, here is the official website of the ARCHIDEX 2015: http://www.archidex.com.my/. Check it out if you want to know more about this exhibition before visiting especially when you have never been to ARCHIDEX before.