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Top 10 Tallest Buildings in the World (as of April 2017)

Posted in Architectural Territory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 8, 2017 by vincentloy

The two cities that witness the birth of skyscrapers are Chicago and New York City in United States. That was over a hundred years ago after the introduction of steel framed construction and passenger elevator that enables buildings to be built much taller. Now in 2017, only one building in United States that is placed within the top 10 tallest buildings in the world currently. The other 9 are generally all located in Asia. Here below is the current top 10 tallest buildings in the world as of April 2017. The list only includes completed buildings and does not include television towers, observation towers, masts, antennas or buildings with very little percentage of habitable floors.

  1. Burj Khalifa, 828 metres, 163 floors, Dubai, United Arab Emirates (completed in 2010).

2. Shanghai Tower, 632 metres, 128 floors, Shanghai, China (completed in 2015).

3. Makkah Royal Clock Tower, 601 metres, 120 floors, Mecca, Saudi Arabia (completed in 2012).

4. Ping An Finance Center, 599 metres, 115 floors, Shenzhen, China (completed in 2017).

5. Lotte World Tower, 555 metres, 123 floors, Seoul, South Korea (completed in 2017).

6. One World Trade Center, 541 metres, 104 floors, New York City, United States (completed in 2014).

7. Guangzhou CTF Finance Centre, 530 metres, 111 floors, Guangzhou, China (completed in 2016).

8. Taipei 101, 508 metres, 101 floors, Taipei, Taiwan (completed in 2004).

9. Shanghai World Financial Center, 492 metres, 101 floors, Shanghai, China (completed in 2008).

10. International Commerce Centre, 484 metres, 108 floors, Hong Kong, China (completed in 2010).

This list will change drastically from year to year due to rapid increase of construction of supertall skyscrapers in the world in recent decade. More and more new buildings are reaching further to the sky. Out of the current top 10 tallest buildings in the world, half of them are in China (this doesn’t even include Taipei 101 in Taiwan). 8 of them soar above 500 metres in height respectively too. Also noted is that every buildings in this top 10 tallest list has over 100 floors respectively. The tallest in the world, Burj Khalifa has been on the top of the list for over 7 years now. By 2020, it is expected to be defeated by Kingdom Tower, a skyscraper currently under construction in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. That tower is projected to soar above 1000 metres (1 km!) when completed in 2020.

The oldest supertall in this list is Taipei 101 which is only 13 years old by now as it is built in 2004. More and more new buildings are joining the list with two newcomers this year; Ping An Finance Center and Lotte World Tower at No.4 and No.5 placing respectively. Former world’s tallest buildings and still the current world’s tallest twin buildings, the Petronas Twin Towers are kicked out of the top 10 list this year as they are now placed at No.11 (and 12) with height of 452 metres. Too bad…my home coutry’s famous twin towers are now out of the ranking. Anyway, in few years to come, Malaysia will have another new supertall; PNB 118 Tower that will certainly join this top 10 list with a height of over 600 metres.

(Images in this post are from various sources throughout the world wide web)

More updated details for KL118 Tower.

Posted in Architectural Territory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 28, 2016 by vincentloy

Finally, after months and months of speculation and secrecy surrounding Malaysia’s plan for the next tallest building of the country, more details had been revealed recently from the officiating ceremony. What is the project that I’m talking about? It’s the KL118 development. Now, it is renamed to PNB118 since PNB is the name of the owner’s company for this project. Well, I prefer KL118 more as it has more international appeal than ‘PNB’. Nobody knows (not only foreigners but also locals) what does PNB stands for.

Also known as ‘Warisan Merdeka’ (Heritage Independence), this development is located on a site just adjacent to the historic Stadium Merdeka and Stadium Negara. It is also located nearby to some very old buildings like Victoria Institution, Methodist Boys School (my former secondary school), Chin Woo Stadium, and Petaling Street (Chinatown). The project has been receiving heavy criticism due to its location on low-lying area which is also full of historical buildings and that this new modern supertall would not fit into this site context. I agreed. This project also receiving strong objection as the money put into this can be more beneficial for other purposes as the city does not need another supertall yet.

The iconic feature of this development would be the construction of an 118-storey tower, now named PNB 118 Tower. The final height of this skyscraper is still not confirmed but it is now fixed to be between 600 metres to 650 metres. Some sources said 610 metres or 630 metres while some even said it would be 644 metres tall which would make it even taller than the Shanghai Tower, the current world’s second tallest building. No matter what the final height is, this PNB118 Tower would still easily be the country’s new tallest building as well as one of top five world’s tallest buildings once it is completed. And it is announced recently that it is expected to be completed in 2024. Years ago, it is planned for completion by 2020 to coincide with Wawasan 2020 (Vision 2020) when the country would become a developed nation by year 2020. However, the project faced delay and it’s getting back on track now. It is now officially under construction.

The tower is designed by Fender Katsalidis Architects, an architecture office based in Melbourne, Australia which is previously famous for designing Eureka Tower in Melbourne. The design is also not that well received as many people commented that it is too simple, too glassy and do not possess timeless elegance like what Petronas Twin Towers achieved. I agreed to these opinions too. However, after its official rendering and an animation clip of the tower are out recently, some changed their mind and started to like the design. I’m one of them, but I still think that the design needs further improvement especially on its treatment to the top where it meets the spire. The spire is also a bit too long and out of proportion in comparison to the building form and volume. I knew it is just there to increase a substantial height for the building just to have it to be placed higher in the list of world’s tallest buildings later on.

So, here below are some new (latest) renderings, plan view and models’ images of the PNB118 Tower and also an animation clip for it by RSP Architects, the local design consultant for this project.

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Looking forward to see this new skyscraper dominating the skyline of Kuala Lumpur as soon as possible. Hmm…I suddenly changed my mind and think that KL needs a new supertall now since Petronas Twin Towers have been here for almost two decades already. However, it is undeniable that the twin towers are still elegant and remain as icon of the country forever.

(Images in this post are from various sources throughout the world wide web)

 

‘Titanic: The Exhibition’ in Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre

Posted in Interesting Encounters with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 10, 2016 by vincentloy

Not having any classes today, I decided to go to the Perth city centre this morning. The reason for it is that I have to visit ‘Titanic: The Exhibition’ currently being held in the Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre (PCEC) at Pavilion 6, Level 1. The lecturer of my culture class visited it and recommended me to pay a visit to this exhibition as I would be writing a scholarly essay later based on this ill-fated ship for my assignment under her subject. As a student, I do get a cheaper ticket price, but it still costs me over AUD 30. That’s still expensive (about RM 100 in Malaysian currency), but I do make full use of that money by reading and analyzing almost all the displays in the exhibition and it took me two hours to finish the tour.

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I think everyone in this world must have heard of the word ‘Titanic’. It is universally known not only because of the magnitude of its sinking back in 1912 on its maiden voyage, but also due to the immense popularity of a 1997 movie of the same name. That particular epic motion picture directed by James Cameron won audiences’ hearts and subsequently winning 11 Academy Awards including Best Picture. Everyone is melted by the love story between Jack and Rose from the movie. It also became the first movie ever in history to cross over US$ 1 billion in original box office release and remain the highest grossing film worldwide for many years before being surpassed by another James Cameron’s movie called ‘Avatar’.

Let’s put the focus back on the ship itself and the exhibition I had just visited this morning regarding its rich history. The ship named RMS Titanic under the ownership of White Star Line was the largest and the most luxurious ship of its time when it was built and first set sail. On its maiden voyage from Southampton, UK to New York City, USA, this British passenger liner struck an iceberg and sank in the North Atlantic Ocean on the early morning of 15th April 1912. This resulted in death of over 1500 people out of about 2200 people on board (only about 700 people were saved from the doomed ship), making it one of the deadliest maritime disasters in modern history.

The exhibition is filled with interactive installations, graphic art, music and videos, artifacts, costumes, postcards, newspaper articles, as well as recreations of the ship’s luxurious interiors (Grand Staircase, First Class Corridor, First and Third Class rooms). The exhibition also included memorabilia from the 1997 blockbuster movie I mentioned above including the famous ‘Heart of the Ocean’ jewelry and the painting of Rose by Jack. The exhibition started with a photo section on the very edge of the ship (where Jack and Rose’s famous postures are in the movie) and ended with a small shop selling Titanic-themed souvenirs. Before I enter, I was presented a boarding pass with a name of a passenger who boarded the ship in 1912. In the exhibition later on, I can check whether the passenger in the boarding pass survived or died from the tragedy or not from the list of survived and lost passengers on a huge wall.

Hereby below are some of the images in the exhibition that I took:

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I had quite a good time going through the exhibition and I’m almost moved to tears by this sad tragedy that took place over a hundred years ago. Nevertheless, my focus in the exhibition is still on finding great information for my Culture assignment of which I selected this particular ship on examining and analyzing how luxury took its form in the ship from its architecture, interior, fittings, accessories and the passengers that varies, depending on the classes of the people on board. I find this topic interesting and has a strong connection to my Architecture and Culture class. Hence, this exhibition that happened to be held right now (will end on this 20th March) is a good platform for me to gain valuable information for my general knowledge as well as for my personal assignment.

The exhibition is good, but can be better. The lighting is not sufficient in some areas. Besides that, interactive installations are also not enough, making it not a very engaging exhibition especially to young kids (they don’t like to read the sea of words on the wall). The recreations of the ship’s interior are great but I’m actually expecting a bit more of that too. The organizer should also put a huge replica (model) of the ship to amaze visitors. Anyway, it is still a visit that gave me a further understanding of the ship’s history and is recommended especially to those who have not known much of the ship before and are eager to find out more.

(Copyrights reserved to all the images in this blog post).

The Amazing Race 26’s highlights.

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 4, 2015 by vincentloy

‘The Amazing Race’ has been my only interested English reality TV show currently after ‘Fear Factor’. It’s a waste that ‘Fear Factor’ is not running anymore with unknown reason. In recent years, I have been catching up with all the latest seasons of ‘The Amazing Race’ which is about a competition where over 10 teams (two in a team) race around the world and complete tasks to win USD$ 1 million in the end. The broadcast of the show had now reached its 26th season with initial broadcast over at the US ending on May 15, 2015. It has only recently started airing at AXN channel in Malaysia. Well, the only way for me to watch all the 12 episodes in this Season 26 is through online for free.

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And yup….I managed to watch all the episodes in 2 days. One episode on Thursday and a whopping eleven episodes on Friday. That’s equal to over 7 hours spent watching on Friday alone. That’s crazy and creepy. Well, you can do that if you have nothing to do and don’t mind having a neck pain and slight headache after that. I’m just very interested on the show, which kept me craving for the next and the next episodes. It has the suspense, climax and intensity in every episodes and the show also taught me various cultures and places across the world where the teams are racing. So, it’s fun and gaining knowledge at the same time from watching the show.

In this 26th season, six existing couples and five blind date teams (who met for the first time at the start of the race) raced across 5 continents, visited 9 countries (Japan, Thailand, Germany, France, Monaco, Namibia, Netherlands, Peru, United States) and traveled approximately 35 000 miles for the USD$ 1 million prize. Only one will win it in the end. It must be hard for the five blind date teams as they have only met their partner when the show started. They don’t know their teammate beforehand. There must be a lot of issues (like communication problem, quarrels, attitudes problem, etc) for them, but ironically, all the three final teams that successfully went into the last leg are the blind date teams. Also not to forget one existing couple team that manage to proceed to the last leg but still eliminated in early stage of the final leg.

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Laura Pierson and Tyler Adams won this season of ‘The Amazing Race’. I’m happy for them. They are steady, stable and filled with positive energy during the race most of the time. Jelani and Jenny finished in second place, and I’m glad for them too. Jenny is a strong and tough girl. She is exerting authority most of the time, leaving Jelani only looks like following orders from his teammate. Pity Jelani. Hayler and Blair finished third. In the 10th and 11th leg, they stayed at the top among the other teams, making them as the frontrunner for the champion title. But in the last leg, a fatal mistake made by Hayley at Reunion Tower, Dallas caused them the USD$ 1 million. Talking about Hayley, she was the most annoying person in this season. She is weak, clumsy, irritating, and has bad attitude most of the time. Eventhough her teammate Blair do make mistakes some of the time, but she is the one that makes the team fall behind all the time. A big pity for Blair in getting this horrible teammate. He had been very calm and patient on dealing with her already.

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In this season, the teams made a lot of selfies. Interesting. There is even one team that missed a train while they were taking a selfie, causing a delay on their race. Opps. Selfie Fail. I’m informed that the 27th season of ‘The Amazing Race’ is currently filming. Good. Looking forward to it. It is scheduled to premier on 25th September 2015 and to finish airing by end of the year (I guess). Keep it running. Don’t make it stop. I just love this show. As the show’s title said, it’s really amazing.

(Images in this post are from various sources throughout the world wide web)

The 4 Kings of Badminton.

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 24, 2015 by vincentloy

Badminton has been one of my favourite sports. I seldom play badminton but I love to watch badminton tournaments. There has been quite a lot of talks on this particular sport this month. The first is when Lee Chong Wei can get back to play in badminton tournaments beginning this month after he is banned for eight months from his doping case last year. Next was the prestigious Sudirman Cup 2015, a mixed team championship held this month too and won by the reigning champion and host nation, China as expected. And then, recently, YONEX organized a friendly exhibition match in China and invited the 4 great kings of badminton.

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Who are the 4 kings of badminton? They must possess impressive records in the sport, well known, have held world number one ranked player and considered as icon of badminton respectively. They are Lin Dan of China, Lee Chong Wei of Malaysia, Taufik Hidayat of Indonesia and Peter Gade of Denmark. 4 men, 4 different countries, and they ruled the sport respectively (in men single event) from 2000s.

Lin Dan (China)

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– Age 32 this year.

– Two-time Olympic champion (gold-medalist), five-time World champion, and five-time All England champion.

– By age of 28, he had won all nine major titles in badminton world; Olympic Games, World Championships, World Cup (no more now), Thomas Cup, Sudirman Cup, Super Series Masters Finals, All England Open, Asian Games and Asian Championships, becoming the first and only player in history to achieve that.

– 57 career titles to date.

– Currently in semi-retired position.

Lee Chong Wei (Malaysia)

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– Age 33 this year.

– Ranked first worldwide in men-single badminton player for the longest, for 298 weeks. Have been ranked first worldwide for a consecutive 199 weeks.

– Two-time Olympic silver-medalist, currently the most successful Malaysian Olympian in history, and earned him the title of Dato’. Also two-time Commonwealth Games gold-medalist. Won Malaysian Open for a record 10 times.

– 55 career titles to date.

– Currently still actively playing in tournaments.

Taufik Hidayat (Indonesia)

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– Age 34 this year.

– Olympic champion (gold medalist), also champion in World Championships, Asian Championships, Asian Games, South East Asian Games, and Thomas Cup.

– Won Indonesian Open for a record 6 times.

– Over 27 career titles to date.

– Currently retired.

Peter Gade (Denmark)

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– Age 39 this year.

– 5-time winner of European Championships, All England champion, World GrandPrix champion.

– Over 40 career titles to date.

– Currently retired.

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Out of the 4 great men in badminton, Lin Dan is no doubt the most successful in the history of badminton. Nicknamed ‘Super Dan’, he is simply unbeatable in most of the major tournaments he participated in. No one can challenge his record. Also let us not forget the mighty presence of Lee Chong Wei. Despite not winning all the major titles, but his very active participation in almost all the badminton championships available and winning many of them helped him become the longest number one player in history. Taufik Hidayat and Peter Gade are also awesome in this particular sport.

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Right now, the number one player (in men single) is Chen Long from China. He is one strong badminton player to fear for right now.

(Images in this post are from various sources throughout the world wide web)

Architectural Insight: Guggenheim Helsinki Design Competition

Posted in Architectural Territory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 28, 2015 by vincentloy

Late last week, the next step in the long road to Guggenheim Helsinki moved forward when the museum released the final renderings from all six finalists. After being selected by the 11-member jury late last year from a record-breaking pool of 1,715 submissions, the finalists have been refining their designs for the Finnish outpost of the museum for the past five months. Their proposals are still anonymous, since the plans have yet to be paired up with the six firms still in competition: Fake Industries Architectural Agonism (New York/Barcelona/Sydney), SMAR Architecture Studio (Madrid/Australia), AGPS Architecture (Zurich/Los Angeles), Asif Khan (London), Haas Cook Zemmrich STUDIO2050 (Stuttgart) and Moreau Kusunoki Architect (Paris).

“The concept was to maybe get our most complete interface to the public in Helsinki,” says Troy Conrad Therrien, Curator, Architecture and Digital Initiatives at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and Museum. “This is the moment of the big unveiling. The idea was to tell the whole story. This is an interesting moment in architecture where architectural production is becoming faster because of digital processes; In the next several years, the mark of 1,700 will potentially get passed.”

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In addition to releasing the final renderings, the museum has also mounted an interactive exhibition, Guggenheim Helsinki Now: Six Finalist Designs Unveiled, at the Kunsthalle Helsinki in Finland, featuring an array of interactive displays and public events (Jeanne Gang and Bjarke Ingels gave lectures yesterday). Finnish architect and theorist Martti Kalliala and Hugo Liu, principal scientist for eBay, built a data-based display that looks at contemporary museum architecture and analyzes the entire competition data set. As we’ve seen before, the thousands of entries provide quite a lot of fodder for number-crunching.

Perhaps the most unique aspect of the finalist roll out is the Matchmaker Game, designed by Liu, that matches users to one of the six designs based on a series of personality-drive questions (which speculative museum model are you?). Hopefully this won’t lead to a swipe-left analysis of future proposals. The final renderings, as well as competitor comments, are below. The winner will be chosen June 23.

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The design of the Guggenheim Helsinki and its woven landscape are based upon a sensitive and sympathetic approach to the context and nature of Helsinki. The design encourages people to flow within a new cultural core that is linked to the rest of the city, through the port promenade and the pedestrian footbridge to the Observatory Park. This flexible access welcomes not only the visitors but also serves as a key cultural destination for the community.

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The museum skyline is composed by independent volumes, highlighted by a landmark tower. These fragmented art exhibition spaces allow strong integration with outdoor display and events, while the lighthouse offers a new perspective over the city. This new museum concept together with the charred timber façade echoes the process of regeneration that occurs when forests burn and then grow back stronger.

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The museum is composed of two spaces – one for exhibitions, the other a public forum – that come together in a dance involving art and the city, gradually engaging in multiple movements, from a pas de deux, to a pas de trois, etcetera. One space of the museum is on the dock level of the port facility, acknowledging the site’s industrial function as a vital memory for the new ensemble. Part gathering place, part community center, part incubator for innovation, it is conceived as a social commons within the city.

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The other space of the museum houses art exhibitions. Hovering in the air, it offers a place for contemplation, with large open galleries, complementing its companion space below. Greater than the sum of its parts, the museum generates multiple relations among people, architecture, and the arts. With this, the Guggenheim Helsinki can engage a broad constituency of stakeholders, benefiting not only the arts, but the public at large.

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Five timber towers huddle together at the edge of the Baltic Sea, forming a shimmering beacon on the shoreline.
Multiple forms produce an interplay of light and shadow that create an inspiring, enticing atmosphere, while glimpses of in-between spaces beckon visitors from near and far. The warmth and familiarity of the wood shingle façade creates a sense of belonging with the landscape, while an ethereal quality is expressed through its subtle oscillation, ruffling, as though brushed by the winds of the sea.

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Helsinki Five seeks to engage a sense of discovery that is deeply informed by art, instigating close encounters between artwork and viewer, between art-maker and art-making. It is a play of hide and seek, light and dark, wide and close, in and out.

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Our proposal takes the form of a Helsinki city block rotated to the harbourfront. Seven timber-clad galleries are stacked over a basement and three levels flanked by administration and open-format halls. Public spaces are formed between these and an intelligent textured glass skin wrapping the entirety to precisely diffuse light, translucent below, and transparent above. The lower galleries join as needed, while the third floor is one super-space. The variety enables a wide range of curatorial approaches.

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The museum’s three entrances are arrived at by new cobble and gravel walking routes. Centrally a wide, convivial staircase helps visitors wayfind intuitively. “Art Kioski” annex for young Nordic art twins the historic Kauppahalli while a sculpture garden is enclosed to the south. In 1800s Helsinki city blocks were named after wild animals. The proposed new block will have the tactile familiarity of a pet’s fur. So we call this proposal “quiet animal”.

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The use of Street Space forms the basis for basic social discourse, from political gatherings to Art creation or community expressions. While an increasing “unofficial” art was blooming in the streets from the second half of the XX Century, Museums have been historically focused in Gallery Art, excluding Public Space production.

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Future is “bottom up”. Museums have to change from institutions where information was directed in only one way: towards the viewer into institutions that are increasingly creating conversations with the citizen, prioritizing the human scale of a space over its merely sculptural value. Due to its particular climatic conditions. There are 2 cities in Helsinki. Summer Helsinki and Winter Helsinki. We propose a Strategy that could offer back to the City an Interior Street, Public Space at no additional cost to be used also the 6 cold months of the year. The combination of 2 programs -The Museum -Gallery Art- and The Extra Space -Street Art- in a single building allows us to explore the relationship between 2 complementary worlds. Using both factors, we had the chance to add, subtract, divide… We decided to multiply.

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Helsinki is a city of interiors. Due to its extreme climatic conditions, Helsinki’s civic society blossoms indoors. Our proposal for the Guggenheim Helsinki, 47 Rooms, extends this network using the architectural technologies that construct Helsinki’s interior citizenry: i.e. walls, doors, windows, and the machinery that defines atmospheric conditions. 47 Rooms contains nine rooms of 20x20m, twenty-seven of 6.5×6.5m six of 10x10m, two of 120x4m and one of 32x120m and three outdoor rooms. A multiplicity of chambers and climatic conditions will allow various museums to live together in the same building. The museum is ready to welcome individual visitors, families, local art scene, high school visits, young audiences, international tourists, groups of friends… 47 Rooms is a machine to provide singular and ever-changing experiences by opening and closing doors to different climates.

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47 Rooms extends the logic through which Helsinki’s population already tempers their more intimate public spaces. Imitating the logic of the Sauna, each room’s final climatic conditions include certain degree of negotiation between the institution and its visitors. 47 Rooms means a strategic shift on Guggenheim’s identity: it embraces Helsinki focusing on interior climate rather than external appearance.

(Original source of article: http://curbed.com/archives/2015/04/27/guggenheim-helsinki-releases-6-finalists.php)

Which one of the 6 finalist proposals above that you like? I’m quite satisfied with the 1st, 3rd and 5th ones. The other three are also not bad. Each has their different views and directions on interpreting their interesting ideas through architectural design. It’s actually very subjective and hard to select the best out of these six.

More details revealed for the mysterious KL118 Tower

Posted in Architectural Territory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 18, 2015 by vincentloy

After giving my attention on several supertall skyscrapers under construction in China in my previous blog post, it’s time to shift back the focus to one supertall also currently undergoing construction back in my home city, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It is the controversial KL118 Tower. Why I said it is controversial? Because the project is receiving much more criticism than praise from the citizens regarding the need of the city for another supertall building. People also questioned that the budget (over RM 5 billion) allocated for it may be of better use in other areas. It is also criticized for its location as the site of the project is in the vicinity of many heritage buildings (Petaling Street, Stadium Merdeka, Stadium Negara, Methodist Boys School, Victoria Institution, etc) and the tower and its surrounding proposed complex development will leaves huge impact and further heavy traffic to the area.

Whatever the criticisms are, the project is given the nod to proceed but not much details are publicized about the tower since then. The KL118 Tower makes up part of a complex of development known as Warisan Merdeka (Heritage Independence) development that also includes residential towers, shopping mall, etc. The tower itself has 118 floors, and will easily surpass Petronas Twin Towers (452 metres high) as the tallest building in Malaysia. There has been speculations till now over the final height of the tower. Previously, it is tipped to be slightly over 500 metres. Then, the height is revised to allow the building to go taller without adding more floors by amending the design of the spire, the finishing crown to the skyscraper.

So, what’s the height it would be? Based on the elevations or sections drawings available (leaked online), the building will be slightly over 600 metres. The height indicated from the ground floor is at about 75 metres till the top showing 715 metres. Hence, after the reduction, the building will reach full height of 640 metres. However, I think the structure / antenna above the spire will not be counted as the architectural height of the building. Hence, the final height of the tower would be about 610 metres. And there is a feeling in me that I think the tower will be of 615.7 metres (2020 feet high) in the end, to coincide with Wawasan (Vision) 2020; the year 2020 of which we targeted to achieve the high-income / developed nation status for Malaysia. It is also the year the tower would be opened to the public after its estimated completion in 2019.

Official renderings of KL118 Tower:

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3D works of KL118 Tower by other parties:

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 (Renderings by Atifnadzir, http://www.skyscrapercity.com

Scale comparison of KL118 Tower (third from left) with other built supertall skyscrapers in the world. Petronas Twin Towers are on the most right:

 

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Architectural drawings (plan, sections & elevations) of KL118 Tower. Here you can see quite clearly how the spire looks like, and the observation and viewing sky decks occupy four floors of the tower. And there’s a restaurant on level 113! :

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Current site condition ( 2014 – 2019, now still construction at foundation and base level, long way to go):

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When completed, it will be one of the top ten tallest buildings in the world (probably in 6th or 7th place). Now, after seeing more images / renderings of the tower, what is your thought on its design which is obviously based on diamond. KL118 Tower (I think the name will change later on when it is opened) is designed by Fender Katsalidis Architects, an Australian architectural firm. It’s a nice, sleek and futuristic design, but I hope that they can do more on its elevations and its top part which is a bit boring. It is not as appealing or as impressive if compared to Petronas Twin Towers besides than its height. Still, KL118 Tower would be a good addition to the skyline of KL.

(Images in this post are from various sources throughout the world wide web)