China’s mighty rule in building skyscrapers.


Dubai is home to the current world tallest building, Burj Khalifa which is also the world tallest man made structure ever constructed. Known as the jewel in the desert in United Arab Emirates, Dubai had also built quite a number of other highrises as well as other large-scale developments like man-made islands and over-luxurious hotels. But wait a second, when you look further east to Asia, then you would realize how great also China is doing on building skyscrapers.

Well, I didn’t mean to compare Dubai to China in competition to build skyscrapers as it would be quite unfair to Dubai as only a small city as opposed to China as a huge country with multiple developing cities. The point now is do you know how many skyscrapers taller than Petronas Twin Towers (452 metres) are under construction in China now? You would be shocked when you know the answer. It’s five buildings. Yes, it’s 5. And that is only counting the ones in construction, not including the ones already built that are higher than the twin towers. If that are included, then the final figure would be 7 (492m Shanghai World Financial Center and 484m International Commerce Centre).

Out of the five supertall skyscrapers under construction now in China, two are over 600 metres tall, one in around 600 metres, another one over 500 metres, and another one above 450 metres. Now, there are only two buildings that surpassed that height, Burj Khalifa (828m) and Macca Royal Clock Hotel Tower (601m). I think it’s seriously the time for my capital, Kuala Lumpur to build new supertall to catch up on the ranking since Petronas Twin Towers (the tallest in Malaysia) are already quite far behind, currently placed 6th (and 7th) in world tallest buildings’ list.

The highest one currently under construction in China as well as in the world is the Pingan International Finance Centre. It contains 115 floors and the height would be around 650 metres. Once completed in 2015, it would be the second tallest in the world, and of course tallest in Shenzhen, the city this building is located. Shenzhen is also home to another two supertall skyscrapers, the recently-completed Kingkey 100 (442m) and Shun Hing Square (384m).

 

(Image above shows the night rendering of Pingan International Finance Centre which would be a new supertall to the city of Tianjin. Image is from http://i52.tinypic.com/30mmqdd.jpg)

The next building in the list would be the famous Shanghai Tower that would fulfills the early ambition of having three supertalls in Pudong District, Shanghai, China when it is first planned back in early 1990s. The tower would reach 632 metres high with 128 floors, much taller than its neighbouring skyscrapers, Shanghai World Financial Center (492m, current tallest in China) and Jin Mao Tower (421m). It is to be completed in 2014, and the construction progress of the tower now has been very good and fast.

 

(Image above shows the rendering of Shanghai Tower (tallest) with the already-built Shanghai World Financial Center and Jin Mao Tower as its neighbouring supertalls. Image is from http://ewcg.dreamhosters.com/wp-content/gallery/g_shanghaitower/e_shanghaitower1_600.jpg)

The next building under construction would be the much lesser heard Goldin Finance 117 Tower. It is to reach 597 metres (most probably 600m in the end) and would contains 117 floors as already suggested from the building’s unofficial name itself. It is to be built in Tianjin, China. There isn’t any report over the expected year of completion for this tower, as I think there must be some kind of delay to this mega project. But if the construction went well, then it is predicted to be completed by 2016 or 2017. Well, there isn’t any much update or news coverage over this project, and I couldn’t say any further regarding it.

 

(Image above shows the rendering of the Goldin Finance 117 Tower looking from the ground level. Image is from http://media.photobucket.com/image/goldin%20finance%20117/z0rgggg/others2/others3/goldin_900x600.jpg)

The next tower on the list would be the Chow Tai Fook Center. The building would reach 530 metres high with 116 floors, almost a hundred metres taller than the current tallest building in the city of Guangzhou (438m Guangzhou International Finance Center) where this building would be situated. The other supertall in Guangzhou now is the CITIC Plaza of 391 metres high. Chow Tai Fook Center is expected to be completed by 2016 and that would adds up another beautiful skyscraper to the city of Guangzhou that has been fast developing, thanks to the positive impact of the very successful Guangzhou 2010 Asian Games.

 

(Image above shows the rendering of Chow Tai Fook Center (tallest) with the already-built Guangzhou International Finance Center. Image is from http://archrecord.construction.com/news/2011/03/110302skyscrapers_climb_higher/8_CTF_Centre_Guangzhou.jpg)

The last on the list, considered to be a very tall skyscraper to be built in Tianjin also is the R&F Tower. It would be completed in 2014 ad that the tower contains 91 floors and would rise up to the height of 468 metres. It appears that Tianjin now joins in the list of cities in China (the others; Shanghai, Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Nanjing) that sees vibrant economy and fast developing rate that would eventually contributes to increment of tall buildings to showcase the strength of a particular city.

 

(Image above shows the rendering of R&F Tower to be built at Tianjin, China. Image is from http://media.photobucket.com/image/r%2526f%20tianjin/z0rgggg/233244dmuulmdamymdm26d.jpg)

Well, if you want to include buildings currently under-construction in China that exceeded 300 metres to be qualified to be known as supertall skyscrapers, then the list is no doubt would not ends here. I think now the definition of supertall should be restricted to only buildings above 400 metres, since it is already too common to have buildings over 300 metres in these years.

(Information from this post regarding data of the skyscrapers mentioned are known from http://www.skyscraperpage.com)

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